Log in or Register for enhanced features | Forgotten Password?
White Papers | Suppliers | Events | Report Store | Companies | Dining Club | Videos
Green Power
Solar
Return to: CTBR Home | Green Power | Solar

Adani to begin work on 170MW Australian solar project

CTBR Staff Writer Published 13 September 2017

Indian conglomerate Adani’s Australian subsidiary will start working on the 170MW Moranbah solar project situated in Queensland, Australia.

The solar project will be built in several stages, as per Adani Australia. In the first stage, the company will build a 65MW solar plant on a 600 hectare piece of land, which was part of the Rugby Run grazing property.

Adani is planning to install mono Passivated Emitter Rear Cell (PERC) technology and single axis tracking systems that are claimed to improve efficiency and output.

Further stages are being planned, which will increase the generation capacity to 170MW. This first phase is expected to take one year for completion.

Adani Renewables CEO, Jennifer Purdie stated that the first stage of the solar plant will begin shortly and the cost is anticipated to reach in excess of A$100m ($80m). The project recently received Development Approval from Isaac Regional Council.

She said: “This is an exciting project in terms of its size, location, and the technology we are using.

“This will be Adani Renewables’ first project – the first of many – and we thank the Isaac Regional Council, in particular Mayor Anne Baker and her officers for their assistance and encouragement.”

The company has already started preparatory work including cultural heritage surveys and engineering design and has also started ordering critical equipment.

As per the company, the project will create employment for 150 people during the peak of the construction. Once completed, the solar plant will create 6 full time operation staff.

The company is planning to install as much as 1.5GW of solar plants in Australia in the next five years. 


Image: Adani to build 170MW solar plant in Queensland, Australia. Photo: Courtesy of Debbie Mous/FreeImages.com.